Physiology

Brain comes to light

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To perceive seasons, animals compare changes in day length with the constant cycle of their inner circadian clock. At a molecular level, light signals trigger coordinated gene-expression events in the brain.

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Figure 1: A light-sensitive hormonal tap.

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