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Sidelines

Zoo news special

Copycat birth

Credit: L. WADWORTH, TEXAS A&M UNIV.

CC, the world's first cloned cat, has proved her own reproductive credentials by becoming a mother. CC, also known as Copycat, gave birth to three kittens (pictured) in September, it was revealed this week.

Dog doubles

Meanwhile, Korean embryologists have improved the efficiency of canine cloning. They created three female Afghan hounds from 167 implanted embryos. Last year, Snuppy, the first cloned dog, and a short-lived pup were the only successes from 1,095 embryos.

Dolphin drama

The world's tallest man, Bao Xishun, was called in to save two dolphins that had swallowed plastic shards at an aquarium in Fushun, northeast China. After surgical instruments failed to remove the sharp slivers, Bao used one of his 1.06-metre arms to reach in and extract the chunks from the dolphins' stomachs.

Wimpy seals

Climate change is allowing subordinate males on a remote Scottish island a chance to mate. Higher temperatures and lower rainfall mean that female grey seals forage over a wider range, making it more difficult for the top male to keep an eye on them all.

Rhino romps

Animal-rights activists have slammed plans for a 175-metre sightseeing wheel in Berlin, saying that the bright lights on the structure would disturb the mating habits of endangered rhinos in the nearby zoo.

Sources: BBC, Reuters, Theriogenology

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Sidelines. Nature 444, 982 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/444982a

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