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Islam and science: Where are the new patrons of science?

Muslim nations must take a big leap forward in developing science and technology to catch up with the rest of the world, argues Herwig Schopper, or they risk falling behind in the global economy.

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References

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  1. Herwig Schopper is former director-general of CERN and president of the SESAME council.

    • Herwig Schopper
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Schopper, H. Islam and science: Where are the new patrons of science?. Nature 444, 35–36 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/444035a

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