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Palaeoceanography

In hot water

Nature volume 443, pages 920921 (26 October 2006) | Download Citation

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There has long been scepticism about the geochemical evidence that the ancient ocean was markedly warm. A fresh approach bolsters the case for an ocean that, in the distant past, was indeed quite hot.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Christina L. De La Rocha is at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Columbusstraße, 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany. crocha@awi-bremerhaven.de

    • Christina L. De La Rocha

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/443920a

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