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Neuroscience

Controlled capillaries

Nature volume 443, pages 642643 (12 October 2006) | Download Citation

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The finest scale of blood flow through the brain occurs in capillaries. Suspicions that capillary flow is regulated by cells that put the squeeze on these vessels are now borne out by detailed experiments.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Brian A. MacVicar is in the Brain Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada.  bmacvica@interchange.ubc.ca

    • Brian A. MacVicar
  2. Michael W. Salter is in the Program in Neurosciences and Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.  mike.salter@utoronto.ca

    • Michael W. Salter

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https://doi.org/10.1038/443642a

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