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Microbiology

Resurrecting a broken genome

Nature volume 443, pages 517519 (05 October 2006) | Download Citation

Subjects

A remarkable bacterium can survive extraordinary doses of ionizing radiation that shatter its genome into thousands of pieces. How does it accurately reassemble these DNA fragments into an intact genome?

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Susan T. Lovett is in the Department of Biology, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 02454-9110, USA. lovett@brandeis.edu

    • Susan T. Lovett

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/443517b

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