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Does gender matter?

The suggestion that women are not advancing in science because of innate inability is being taken seriously by some high-profile academics. Ben A. Barres explains what is wrong with the hypothesis.

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Figure 1: Maths-test scores for ages 4 to 18.
Figure 2: Competence scores awarded after peer review.

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Barres, B. Does gender matter?. Nature 442, 133–136 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/442133a

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