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Can computers help to explain biology?

Nature volume 440, pages 416417 (23 March 2006) | Download Citation

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The road leading from computer formalisms to explaining biological function will be difficult, but Roger Brent and Jehoshua Bruck suggest three hopeful paths that could take us closer to this goal.

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Acknowledgements

We are grateful to L. Lok, K. Tahashashi, D. Endy, O. Resnekov, P. Rabinow, D. Gillespie, M. Cook and M. Riedel for useful discussions and comments on the manuscript.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Roger Brent is at The Molecular Sciences Institute, Berkeley, California 94704, USA

    • Roger Brent
  2. Jehoshua Bruck is at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.

    • Jehoshua Bruck

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/440416a

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