Commentary | Published:

2020 Computing

Exceeding human limits

Nature volume 440, pages 409410 (23 March 2006) | Download Citation

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Scientists are turning to automated processes and technologies in a bid to cope with ever higher volumes of data. But automation offers so much more to the future of science than just data handling, says Stephen H. Muggleton.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Stephen H. Muggleton is in the Department of Computing and the Centre for Integrative Systems Biology at Imperial College London SW7 2BZ, UK.

    • Stephen H. Muggleton

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/440409a

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