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Earth science

Megathrust investigations

We know the basic events of 26 December 2004: a giant earthquake beneath the Indian Ocean generated a devastating tsunami. But geoscientists are still learning about processes initiated during the earthquake.

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Figure 1: Seismic activity before, during and after the great Sumatra–Andaman earthquake (including events beneath the Andaman Sea).

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