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Plant biology: Abscisic acid in bloom

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To survive environmental stresses, plants must respond to the hormone abscisic acid. The receptors for this hormone have remained elusive, but one receptor with unique functions in flowering has now been identified.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Julian I. Schroeder and Josef M. Kuhn are at the Division of Biological Sciences, Cell and Developmental Biology Section, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0116, USA. julian@biomail.ucsd.edu

    • Julian I. Schroeder
    •  & Josef M Kuhn

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