Deeper into the genome

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The next large-scale human genome project after HapMap should catalogue inherited variation in the general population that directly affects gene function, argues Richard Gibbs.

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References

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    International HapMap Consortium Nature 437, 1299–1320 (2005).

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    Gibbs, R. A. et al. Genomics 7, 235–244 (1990).

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    Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff, UK http://www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk/hgmd0.html

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    Belmont, J. W. & Gibbs, R. A. Am. J. Pharmacogenom. 4, 253–262 (2004).

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    http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/exon/ and http://www.celera.com/celera/applera_genomics

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SNP/

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    Working Group on Biomedical Technology http://www.genome.gov/Pages/About/NACHGR/May2005NACHGRAgenda/ReportoftheWorkingGrouponBiomedicalTechnology.pdf

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    Lin, Z., Owen, A. B. & Altman, R. B. Science 305, 183 (2004).

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Acknowledgements

Thanks to J. Belmont, D. Nelson and F. Yu for discussions and for reading the manuscript.

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