Mars

Twin studies on Mars

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The twin Mars Exploration Rovers don't themselves range widely, but the observations they make do. Information on partial solar eclipses, salty rocks and magnetic dust are among the latest highlights of the rovers' findings.

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Figure 1: Spirit in the Gusev crater.

NASA/JPL/CORNELL (J. BELL)

Figure 2: Rocks and sands of Mars.

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Catling, D. Twin studies on Mars. Nature 436, 42–43 (2005) doi:10.1038/436042a

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