Brief Communication | Published:

Musical imagery

Sound of silence activates auditory cortex

Nature volume 434, page 158 (10 March 2005) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Auditory imagery occurs when one mentally rehearses telephone numbers or has a song ‘on the brain’ — it is the subjective experience of hearing in the absence of auditory stimulation, and is useful for investigating aspects of human cognition1. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify and characterize the neural substrates that support unprompted auditory imagery and find that auditory and visual imagery seem to obey similar basic neural principles.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. * Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, USA

    • David J. M. Kraemer
    • , C. Neil Macrae
    • , Adam E. Green
    •  & William M. Kelley
  2. † School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 2UB, UK

    • C. Neil Macrae

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to William M. Kelley.

Supplementary information

PDF files

  1. 1.

    Supplementary Methods

    Description of the subjects, materials, experimental design, data acquisition parameters, and data analyses. Includes a figure of the experimental design and a graph of signal change for the audible portions of familiar and unknown songs.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/434158a

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