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Archaeology

Much rowing for fish

A thousand years ago, there was a shift in the fish diet in England from freshwater to marine species. The relevant case history, derived from picking through leftovers, has a contemporary resonance.

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Pauly, D. Much rowing for fish. Nature 432, 813–814 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1038/432813a

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