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Cognitive science

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Nature volume 430, pages 732733 (12 August 2004) | Download Citation

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Pinyon jays seem to work out how to behave towards an unfamiliar jay by watching it in encounters with members of their own flock. The findings provide clues about how cognition evolved in social animals.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Sara J. Shettleworth is in the Departments of Psychology and Zoology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. shettle@psych.utoronto.ca

    • Sara J. Shettleworth

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/430732b

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