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Role of CBP/P300 in nuclear receptor signalling

Nature volume 383, pages 99103 (05 September 1996) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE nuclear receptor superfamily includes receptors for steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone and vitamin D, as well as many related proteins1,3. An important feature of the action of the lipophilic hormones and vitamins is that the maintenance of homeostatic function requires both intrinsic positive and negative regulation4,5. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that identifies the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and its homologue P300 (refs 6, 7) as cofactors mediating nuclear-receptor-activated gene transcription. The role of CBP/P300 in the transcrip-tional response to cyclic AMP, phorbol esters, serum, the lipophilic hormones and as the target of the E1A oncoprotein suggests they may serve as integrators of extracellular and intracellular signalling pathways.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. The Gene Expression Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA

    • Debabrata Chakravarti
    • , Vickie J. LaMorte
    • , Michael C. Nelson
    • , Ira G. Schulman
    • , Henry Juguilon
    •  & Ronald M. Evans
  2. The Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA

    • Toshihiro Nakajima
    •  & Marc Montminy
  3. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA

    • Ronald M. Evans

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https://doi.org/10.1038/383099a0

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