Letter | Published:

A polymeric optical pattern-recognition system for security verification

Nature volume 383, pages 5860 (05 September 1996) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

POLYMERS that exhibit the photorefractive effect—a light-induced modulation of refractive index—are emerging as attractive materials for optical devices and processing systems1,2. Here we demonstrate one such application using our recently developed high-efficiency photorefractive polymer2. The polymer provides a nonlinear medium in which real-time all-optical image correlation, and hence pattern recognition, can be accomplished. This forms the basis of an optical security system, whereby documents are encoded with practically invisible phase masks (such masks are difficult to forge), which may then be rapidly screened to verify the authenticity of the documents. The wavelengths at which our optical system operates are compatible with commercial low-power semiconductor laser diodes, and the system can be integrated into a compact device at low cost.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    & Chem. Rev. 94, 127–155 (1944).

  2. 2.

    , , , & Nature 371, 497–500 (1994).

  3. 3.

    van Renesse, R. L. (ed.) Optical Document Security (Artech House, Boston, 1994).

  4. 4.

    & Opt. Engng. 33, 1752–1756 (1994).

  5. 5.

    Digital Communications with Space Applications (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1964).

  6. 6.

    & Appl. Phys. Lett. 37, 5–7 (1980).

  7. 7.

    et al. Appl. Opt. 32, 174–183 (1993).

  8. 8.

    et al. Science 265, 1215–1216 (1994).

  9. 9.

    , & Pattern Recogn. 27, 523–542 (1994).

  10. 10.

    , , & Appl. Opt. 33, 2834–2841 (1994).

  11. 11.

    , , , & Conf. Lasers and Electro-Optics, Tech. Digest Vol. 9, 477 (1996).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721–0094, USA

    • B. L. Volodin
    • , B. Kippelen
    • , K. Meerholz
    •  & N. Peyghambarian
  2. Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Connecticut, 260 Glenbrook Road, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA

    • B. Javidi
  3. Present address: Department of Physical Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich 80333, Germany.

    • K. Meerholz

Authors

  1. Search for B. L. Volodin in:

  2. Search for B. Kippelen in:

  3. Search for K. Meerholz in:

  4. Search for B. Javidi in:

  5. Search for N. Peyghambarian in:

About this article

Publication history

Received

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/383058a0

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.