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Earthquakes: slow down for safety

Nature volume 383, pages 2122 (05 September 1996) | Download Citation

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In December 1992, part of the San Andreas fault ruptured. No damage was caused, because instead of lasting for a few seconds, this earthquake sequence took a week. So why are other earthquakes fast?

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Geophysics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

    • Paul Segall

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/383021a0

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