Letter | Published:

Self-assembly of ten molecules into nanometre-sized organic host frameworks

Nature volume 378, pages 469471 (30 November 1995) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE synthesis of hollow, nanometrescale molecular "container compounds1,2 makes possible the creation of localized chemical microenvironments with properties different from those of the bulk phases; such compounds can be used, for example, to encapsulate otherwise unstable molecular species3. Container compounds have previously been prepared by conventional chemical synthesis1,2. Here we report the construction of a hollow, roughly spherical supramolecular framework by selfassembly4–8. The framework, which is 2–5 nm in diameter, is constructed from ten species: four organic ligands held together by six metal ions. It has tetrahedral symmetry, and has a large central void, in which guest molecules can be accommodated. We show that four adamantyl carboxylate ions can be encapsulated within this selfassembling cage.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inageku, Chiba 263, Japan

    • Makoto Fujita
    • , Daichi Oguro
    • , Mayumi Miyazawa
    • , Hiroko Oka
    •  & Katsuyuki Ogura
  2. Chemical Analysis Center, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inageku, Chiba 263, Japan

    • Kentaro Yamaguchi

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https://doi.org/10.1038/378469a0

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