A first-generation physical map of the human genome

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Abstract

SETS of ordered overlapping cloned genomic DNA fragments that span each of the human chromosomes are urgently needed for identification of human disease genes. Such a physical map also provides unique material to study the structure and function of the genome. We have therefore exhaustively analysed the CEPH yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library, which contains 33,000 clones, whose insert size was individually determined. These YACs have an average length of 0.9 megabases and cover the equivalent of 10 haploid genomes. Several mapping techniques were combined to provide multiple sources of structural information for most of these clones. Finally, the library was screened with more than 2,000 genetic markers quasiuniformly distributed over 90% of the genome. These results should allow the scientific community to construct detailed maps of all human chromosomes. Moreover, we propose a data analysis strategy that produces a first-generation integrated map covering most of the human genome.

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