CENP-E is a putative kinetochore motor that accumulates just before mitosis

Abstract

THE mechanics of chromosome movement, mitotic spindle assembly and spindle elongation have long been central questions of cell biology1. After attachment in prometaphase of a micro-tubule from one pole, duplicated chromosome pairs travel towards the pole in a rapid but discontinuous motion2,3. This is followed by a slower congression towards the midplate as the chromosome pair orients with each kinetochore attached to the microtubules from the nearest pole. The pairs disjoin at anaphase and translocate to opposite poles and the interpolar distance increases. Here we identify CENP-E as a kinesin-like motor protein (Mr 312,000) that accumulates in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. CENP-E associates with kinetochores during congression, relocates to the spindle midzone at anaphase, and is quantitatively discarded at the end of the cell division. CENP-E is likely to be one of the motors responsible for mammalian chromosome movement and/or spindle elongation.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1

    van Beneden, E. Archs Biol., Paris 4, 265–240 (1883).

  2. 2

    Hayden, J. H., Bowser, S. S. & Rieder, C. L. J. Cell Biol. 111, 1039–1045 (1990).

  3. 3

    Rieder, C. L. & Alexander, S. P. J. Cell Biol. 110, 81–96 (1990).

  4. 4

    Yen, T. J. et al. EMBO J. 10, 1245–1254 (1991).

  5. 5

    Chou, P. Y. & Fasman, G. D. Biochemistry 13, 222–245 (1974).

  6. 6

    Lupas, A., van Dyke, M. & Stock, J. Science 252, 1162–1164 (1991).

  7. 7

    Endow, S. A., Henikoff, S. & Soler-Niedziela, L. Nature 345, 81–83 (1990).

  8. 8

    Meluh, P. B. & Rose, M. D. Cell 60, 1029–1041 (1990).

  9. 9

    Hagan, I. & Yanagida, M. Nature 347, 563–566 (1990).

  10. 10

    Yang, J. T., Laymon, R. A. & Goldstein, L. S. B. Cell 56, 879–889 (1989).

  11. 11

    Kosik, K. S., Orecchio, L. D., Schnapp, B., Inouye, H. & Neve, R. L. J. biol. Chem. 265, 3278–3283 (1990).

  12. 12

    MacDonald, H. B. & Goldstein, L. S. B. Cell 61, 991–1000 (1990).

  13. 13

    Otsuka, A. J. et al. Neuron 6, 113–122 (1991).

  14. 14

    LeGuellec, R., Paris, J., Couturier, A., Roghi, C. & Philippe, M. Molec. cell. Biol. 11, 3395–3398 (1991).

  15. 15

    Wright, B. D. et al. J. Cell Biol. 113, 817–833 (1991).

  16. 16

    Navone, F. et al. J. Cell Biol. 117, 1263–1275 (1992).

  17. 17

    Endow, S. A. Trends biochem. Sci. 16, 221–225 (1991).

  18. 18

    Hirokawa, N. et al. Cell 56, 867–878 (1989).

  19. 19

    Kalderon, D., Roberts, B. L., Richardson, W. D. & Smith, A. E. Cell 39, 499–509 (1984).

  20. 20

    Lanford, R. E. & Butel, J. S. Cell 37, 801–813 (1984).

  21. 21

    Robbins, J., Dilworth, S. M., Laskey, R. A. & Dingwall, C. Cell 64, 615–623 (1991).

  22. 22

    Lewis, S. A., Wang, D. & Cowan, N. J. Science 242, 936–938 (1988).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.