Letter | Published:

Stabilization of superionic α-Agl at room temperature in a glass matrix

Nature volume 354, pages 217218 (21 November 1991) | Download Citation

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Abstract

SINCE the discovery1 that the high-temperature phase of silver iodide (α-AgI) has an ionic conductivity comparable to that of the best liquid electrolytes, solid electrolytes have attracted wide interest. Possible applications of these materials range from solid-state batteries to electrochromic displays and sensors2. Although α-AgI displays conductivities of more than 10 S cm−1 (ref. 3), owing to the almost liquid-like mobility of Ag+ ions, the crystal transforms below 147 °C to the β-phase with a conductivity of only 10−5 S cm−1 at room temperature. Efforts to achieve good conductivities at lower temperatures have focused on the addition of a second component to AgI to form solid solutions or new compounds such as RbAg4I5 and Ag2HgI4 (refs 4–7). Here we report our success in depressing the αβ transformation temperature so as to stabilize α-AgI itself at room temperature. We use a melt-quenching technique to prepare crystallites of α-AgI frozen into a silver borate glass matrix. The quenched material showed diffraction peaks characteristic of α-AgI and displayed ionic conductivities of about 10−1 S cm−1. Further development of these glass/crystal composites may make the high ionic conductivity of α-AgI available for room-temperature solid-state applications.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka 591, Japan

    • Masahiro Tatsumisago
    • , Yoshikane Shinkuma
    •  & Tsutomu Minami

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https://doi.org/10.1038/354217a0

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