Oldest known ant fossils discovered

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Abstract

Here we report fossil ants, including a new genus of Ponerinae, about 50 million years (Myr) older than the previous oldest specimens. These discoveries in amber from the Turonian stage (92 Myr ago) of New Jersey in the United States have important implications for estimates dating the origin of ants, and extend the age of an extant ant subfamily back about 50 Myr.

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Figure 1: Photomicrographs of New Jersey ant fossils.

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