Lessons from human progeroid syndromes

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Abstract

A number of human genes have been identified in which mutations can lead to the accelerated emergence of features of senescence. Studies of these genes, and of the functions of their protein products, may lead to a clearer understanding of the nature of senescence, and could provide clues for ways in which ageing might be retarded.

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Figure 1: RecQ helicases.

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