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Oxidants, oxidative stress and the biology of ageing

Nature volume 408, pages 239247 (09 November 2000) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Living in an oxygenated environment has required the evolution of effective cellular strategies to detect and detoxify metabolites of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species. Here we review evidence that the appropriate and inappropriate production of oxidants, together with the ability of organisms to respond to oxidative stress, is intricately connected to ageing and life span.

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Acknowledgements

We thank I. Rovira and R. Wange for their help in the design of illustrations, and T. Johnson, D. Longo, B. Howard, R. Levine, M. Gorospe and N. Epstein for thoughtful comments and discussions.

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Correspondence to Toren Finkel or Nikki J. Holbrook.

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