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Hayflick, his limit, and cellular ageing

Abstract

Almost 40 years ago, Leonard Hayflick discovered that cultured normal human cells have limited capacity to divide, after which they become senescent — a phenomenon now known as the ‘Hayflick limit’. Hayflick's findings were strongly challenged at the time, and continue to be questioned in a few circles, but his achievements have enabled others to make considerable progress towards understanding and manipulating the molecular mechanisms of ageing.

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Figure 1: Leonard Hayflick in 1988.
Figure 2: Young and old human diploid cells (strain WI-38).
Figure 3: Hayflick's three phases of cell culture.
Figure 4: The end-replication problem.

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Correspondence to Jerry W. Shay.

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Shay, J., Wright, W. Hayflick, his limit, and cellular ageing. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 1, 72–76 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1038/35036093

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