Dark-rearing delays the loss of NMDA-receptor function in kitten visual cortex

Article metrics

Abstract

SOME features of the visual cortex develop postnatally in mammals1,2. For example, geniculocortical axons that initially overlap throughout cortical layer IV segregate postnatally into two sets of interleaved eye-specific bands3,4. NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are necessary for eye-specific axon-segregation in the frog tectum5, and as NMDA receptors play a greater part in synaptic transmission in early life6,7 and decrease in function during the period of axon segregation, they may be involved in the segregation of geniculocortical axons: they are well placed to do so as they transduce8 retinally derived signals essential for segregation9. Rearing animals in the dark in early life delays segregation10,11 and prolongs the critical period for plasticity12. We now report that dark-rearing of kittens also delays the loss of NMDA receptor function in the visual cortex, supporting the view that they play an important part in neuronal development and plasticity.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1

    Shatz, C. J., Chun, J. J. M. & Luskin, M. B. Cerebral Cortex Vol. 7, 35–58 (Plenum, New York, 1988).

  2. 2

    Mitchell, D. E. & Timney, B. Handbook of Physiology Section I, Vol. 3, 507–555 (Am. Physiol. Soc., Bethesda, MD, 1984).

  3. 3

    LeVay, S., Stryker, M. P. & Shatz, C. J. J. comp. Neurol. 179, 223–244 (1978).

  4. 4

    LeVay, S., Wiesel, T. N. & Hubel, D. H. J. comp. Neurol. 191, 1–51 (1980).

  5. 5

    Cline, H. T., Debski, E. A. & Constantine-Paton, M. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4342–4345 (1987).

  6. 6

    Tsumoto, T., Hagihara, K., Sato, H. & Hata, Y. Nature 327, 513–514 (1987).

  7. 7

    Fox, K., Sato, H. & Daw, N. J. Neurosci. 9, 2443–2454 (1989).

  8. 8

    Hagihara, K., Tsumoto, T., Sato, H. & Hata, Y. Expl Brain Res. 69, 407–416 (1988).

  9. 9

    Stryker, M. P. & Harris, W. A. J. Neurosci. 6, 2117–2133 (1986).

  10. 10

    Swindale, N. V. J. comp. Neurol. 267, 47–48 (1988).

  11. 11

    Mower, G. D., Caplan, C. J., Christen, W. G. & Duffy, F. H. J. comp. Neurol. 235, 448–466 (1985).

  12. 12

    Cynader, M. & Mitchell, D. E. J. Neurophysiol. 43, 1026–1040 (1980).

  13. 13

    Fox, K., Sato, H. & Daw, N. J. Neurophysiol. 64, 1413–1428 (1990).

  14. 14

    Cline, H. T. & Constantine-Paton, M. J. Neurosci. 10, 1197–1216 (1990).

  15. 15

    Flatman, J. A., Schwindt, P. C. & Crill, W. E. Brain Res. 363, 62–77 (1986).

  16. 16

    Miller, K. D., Keller, J. B. & Stryker, M. P. Science 245, 605–615 (1989).

  17. 17

    Reynolds, I. J. & M. F. Bear, Expl Brain Res. (in the press).

  18. 18

    Gordon, B., Parkinson, D. & Daw, N. W. Soc. Neurosci. Abstr. 17, 986 (1990).

  19. 19

    Bode-Greuel, K. M. & Singer, W. Devl Brain Res. 46, 197–204 (1989).

  20. 20

    MacDonald, J. F., Mody, I. & Salter, M. W. J. Physiol. 414, 17–34 (1989).

  21. 21

    Kleckner, N. W. & Dingledine, R. Science 241, 835–837 (1988).

  22. 22

    Freeman, R. D. & Bonds, A. B. Science 206, 1093–1095 (1979).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Fox, K., Daw, N., Sato, H. et al. Dark-rearing delays the loss of NMDA-receptor function in kitten visual cortex. Nature 350, 342–344 (1991) doi:10.1038/350342a0

Download citation

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.