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Perspectives for vascular genomics

Nature volume 407, pages 265269 (14 September 2000) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Diseases of the vascular system result from a complex mixture of genetic and environmental factors. Data sets, technologies and strategies emanating from the human genome programme have been applied to the analysis of both rare single-gene and common multigenic vascular disorders. Genomic approaches including inter- and intraspecies sequence comparisons, genotyping with dense marker sets spanning the genome, large-scale mutagenesis screens of model organisms, and genome-wide expression profiling have all begun to contribute to the identification of new genes and mechanisms that are central to cardiovascular disease processes.

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Affiliations

  1. †Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA

    • Edward M. Rubin
    •  & Alan Tall

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Correspondence to Edward M. Rubin.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/35025236

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