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Dwarf locus mutants lacking three pituitary cell types result from mutations in the POU-domain gene pit-1

Abstract

Mutations at the mouse dwarf locus (dw) interrupt the normal development of the anterior pituitary gland, resulting in the loss of expression of growth hormone, prolactin and thyroid-stimulating hormone, and hypoplasia of their respective cell types. Disruptions in the gene encoding the POU-domain transcription factor, Pit-1, occur in both characterized alleles of the dwarf locus. The data indicate that Pit-1 is necessary for the specification of the phenotype of three cell types in the anterior pituitary, and directly link a transcription factor to commitment and progression events in mammalian organogenesis.

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Li, S., Crenshaw, E., Rawson, E. et al. Dwarf locus mutants lacking three pituitary cell types result from mutations in the POU-domain gene pit-1. Nature 347, 528–533 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1038/347528a0

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