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Red Queen hypothesis supported by parasitism in sexual and clonal fish

Nature volume 344, pages 864866 (26 April 1990) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE Red Queen hypothesis for the maintenance of biparental sexual reproduction suggests that, for species locked in revolutionary struggles with biological enemies, the production of variable progeny compensates for the genetic or ecological disadvantages of sex1–7. The advantage of sex and recombination under this hypothesis stems from the production of rare phenotypes, which are expected to be more likely to escape infection or predation by coevolved biological enemies. Like many evolutionary hypotheses, the Red Queen hypothesis is difficult to test directly, but its assumptions and predictions can be evaluated7–18. The most critical assumption is that biological enemies will disproportionately attack the most common phenotype19, 20. In this study of parasite loads of coexisting sexual and clonal fish, we find empirical support for this assumption.

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Author information

Author notes

    • Curtis M. Lively

    Present address: Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA.

Affiliations

  1. Center for Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903-0231, USA

    • Curtis M. Lively
    • , Clark Craddock
    •  & Robert C. Vrijenhoek

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/344864a0

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