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A synthetic vaccine protects humans against challenge with asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

Abstract

We have previously shown that a mixture of three synthetic peptides (83.1, 55.1, 35.1), corresponding to fragments of the relative molecular mass 83,000 (83K), 55K and 35K Plasmodium falciparum merozoite-specific proteins, induces protection in Aotus trivirpatus monkeys experimentally infected with P. falciparum1,2. Here we describe two polymeric synthetic hybrid proteins based on these peptides that delay or suppress the development of parasitaemia in immunized human volunteers.

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Patarroyo, M., Amador, R., Clavijo, P. et al. A synthetic vaccine protects humans against challenge with asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Nature 332, 158–161 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1038/332158a0

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