Letter | Published:

Transposon-dependent mutant phenotypes at the Notch locus of Drosophila

Abstract

Many mutations at complex genetic loci in the f ruitfly Drosophila melanogaster are associated with insertions of transposable elements. At the Notch locus, members of one class of insertion-associated mutations, termed glossy-like, produce a recessive viable, smooth-eye phenotype with mottled pigmentation1. Members of a second class, facet, produce a recessive viable, rough-eye phenotype with homogeneous pigmentation1. Both classes of mutations fail to complement Notch lethal mutations, so they behave as Notch alleles1. Here we report that each glossy-like mutation is associated with an insertion of the same transposable element (flea). Each flea insertion occurs in the same orientation, but at different locations within intervening sequences of the Notch locus. In contrast, each facet mutation is associated with insertion of a unique, non-flea, transposable element. Insertions producing a facet phenotype and insertions causing a glossy-like phenotype can break Notch intervening sequences at precisely the same location. This suggests that the type of insertion element rather than its position within an affected gene is the primary determinant of the phenotype observed.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1

    Lindsley, D. L. & Zimm, G. Drosophila Information Service 62, 114–116 (1985).

  2. 2

    Kidd, S., Lockett, T. J. & Young, M. W. Cell 34, 421–433 (1983).

  3. 3

    Grimwade, B. G., Muskavitch, M. A. T., Welshons, W. J., Yedvobnick, B. & Artavanis-Tsakonas, S. Devl Biol. 107, 503–519 (1985).

  4. 4

    Shellenbarger, D. L. & Mohler, J. D. Devl Biol. 62, 432–446 (1978).

  5. 5

    Kidd, S., Kelley, M. R. & Young, M. W. Molec. Cell. Biol. 6, 3094–3108 (1986).

  6. 6

    Welshons, W. J. Genetics 76, 775–794 (1974).

  7. 7

    Karlik, C. C. & Fyrberg, E. A. Cell 41, 57–66 (1985).

  8. 8

    Melton, D. A. et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 12, 7035–7056 (1984).

  9. 9

    Norrander, J., Kempe, T. & Messing, J. Gene 26, 101–106 (1983).

  10. 10

    Sanger, F., Coulson, A. R., Barrell, B. G., Smith, A. J. H. & Roe, B. A. J. molec. Biol. 143, 161–178 (1980).

  11. 11

    Biggin, M. D., Gibson, T. J. & Hong, G. F. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 80, 3963–3965 (1983).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.