Letter | Published:

Is QSO1146+111B,C due to lensing by a cosmic string?

Nature volume 321, pages 420421 (22 May 1986) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

A predicted consequence of cosmic strings is that they should produce equal-brightness double-lens images of distant quasars (QSOs), with separations of up to several minutes of arc (see refs 1, 2). Here I discuss a newly discovered lens candidate3–6: QSO1146+111B,C which appears to consist of two images of equal brightness (B is 1.02 times as bright as C, with virtually identical spectra over the observed range) of a quasar at redshift z = 1.01, which are separated by 2.6 arc min. If this is produced by a cosmic string, its mass per unit length is µ4.0×1023 g cm−1, a value large enough to be interesting for string-assisted galaxy formation7–9 and near the upper limits implied by the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background2,10 and constraints on gravitational radiation11. But note that four other QSOs, also close enough to be double-imaged, have thus far not been detected. Searches for these and for the microwave background temperature shift across the string2,10 would be useful.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    Phys. Rev. D23, 852–857 (1981).

  2. 2.

    Astrophys. J. 288, 422–427 (1985).

  3. 3.

    , & Nature 282, 271–272 (1979).

  4. 4.

    & Astrophys. J. 240, 726–736 (1980).

  5. 5.

    Nature 319, 567–568 (1986).

  6. 6.

    et al. Nature 321, 142–144 (1986).

  7. 7.

    Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc. 192, 663–667 (1980).

  8. 8.

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 1169–1172 (1981).

  9. 9.

    & Nature 312, 598–599 (1985).

  10. 10.

    & Nature 310, 391–393 (1984).

  11. 11.

    & Nature 311, 109–114 (1984).

  12. 12.

    Phys. Lett. 123B, 387–390 (1983).

  13. 13.

    & Astrophys. J. Lett 190, L105–L108 (1974).

  14. 14.

    , & Astrophys. J. 284, 1–22 (1984).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA

    • J. Richard Gott III

Authors

  1. Search for J. Richard Gott in:

About this article

Publication history

Received

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/321420a0

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.