Inversion of chromosome 14 marks human T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

Abstract

Rare cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) in man stem from the malignant proliferation of T cells. The disease is usually more aggressive clinically than B-cell-derived CLL. Various haematological tumours are associated with specific chromosome aberrations (for example, refs 1,2). Only limited numbers of T-cell CLL patients have so far been studied cytogenetically and, whereas chromosome 12 seems particularly to be involved in B-cell CLL3, several markers have been found in T-cell tumours4,6–9. Recently, by stimulating malignant clones with different mitogens, novel chromosome abnormalities have been detected in T-cell CLL5. Using the same approach for additional cases of T-cell CLL, we now report that the most consistent chromosome change is an inversion of the long arm of chromosome 14, inv(14)(q11 q32), in four of five patients. Another remarkable chromosome aberration is trisomy for the long arm of chromosome 8, found in three of five patients.

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