Fertile females produced by inactivation of an X chromosome of ‘sex-reversed’ mice

Abstract

Sex-reversed (Sxr) is a dominant mutation that confers maleness on X/X Sxr mice1. Although its mode of inheritance is typically autosomal, all attempts to map Sxr to an autosomal chromosome have failed2. P. Burgoyne (personal communication) suggested that if Sxr were located at the end of the sex chromosomes, distal to a postulated obligatory cross-over in the X–Y pairing segment, it would show such an apparent autosomal pattern of inheritance. To test whether Sxr is located on one of the X chromosomes, and is perhaps therefore subject to X-chromosome inactivation, we have examined mice heterozygous for an X-autosome translocation, T(X; 16)H (ref. 3), such that the normal X chromosome postulated to carry Sxr is preferentially inactive. Independently, Singh and Jones4 have now shown by in situ hybridization that Sxr consists of a duplicated section of Y chromosome material that is indeed translocated to the distal terminus of one X chromatid during male meiosis5,6. Our results show that when the X chromosome carrying Sxr is preferentially inactivated, fertile T(X; 16)H/X Sxr females can be produced, owing to an associated inactivation of the male-determining Sxr sequences.

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McLaren, A., Monk, M. Fertile females produced by inactivation of an X chromosome of ‘sex-reversed’ mice. Nature 300, 446–448 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1038/300446a0

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