Letter | Published:

A cloned T-cell line from a tolerant mouse represents a novel antigen-specific suppressor cell type

Nature volume 296, pages 456459 (01 April 1982) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Two major alternative models, clonal deletion and suppression, have been proposed as possible explanations for immunological tolerance1,2. We have now isolated a functional T suppressor (Ts) cell clone to analyse the role of Ts cells in the induction and maintenance of tolerance. This cloned, long-term cultured Ts cell line (HF1) was derived from CBA/J mice (H–2k) in which low-zone tolerance (LZT)3 had been induced by sub-immunogenic doses of bovine serum albumin (BSA). HF1 cells show BSA-specific suppressor activity in two in vitro suppressor assays. HF1 Ts cells and a factor derived from them suppress imprinted, carrier-specific T helper (Th) cells in an assay measuring IgG antibody production against fluorescein-conjugated BSA (Flu-BSA). Furthermore, they block DNA synthesis in an antigen-specific in vitro T-cell proliferation assay. Their proliferation in the presence of antigen-presenting cells is antigen specific and shows restriction to the I–Ak region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In addition, HF1 Ts cells have a characteristic cytotoxic activity. The data reported suggest that clonal deletion and suppression models are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Clonal deletion could manifest itself by the action of Ts cells.

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  1. Department of Immunology, University of Münster, Domagkstraβe 10, 4400 Münster, FRG

    • Joachim Heuer
    • , Karin Brüner
    • , Bertram Opalka
    •  & Eckehart Kölsch

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https://doi.org/10.1038/296456a0

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