Letter | Published:

Self-excitation of olfactory bulb neurones

Nature volume 296, pages 441444 (01 April 1982) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

The concept that neurotransmitter released from a neurone may feed back and influence the excitability of the same neurone has been suggested by a variety of evidence. Anatomical studies have shown that axon collaterals can arborize among the dendrites of the parent neurone1–7, suggesting a direct feedback via axon collaterals. In addition, the dendritic release of dopamine from substantia nigra neurones has suggested that dopamine may exert a direct feedback inhibition of these neurones8,9. Little electrophysiological evidence is available, however, to indicate that such a mechanism does exist. Based on intracellular recordings, Park et al.10 have proposed a direct inhibitory feedback in the neostriatum, but a presynaptic mechanism was not entirely excluded. We have now found that blockade of synaptic inhibition of relay neurones in the olfactory bulb unmasks long-lasting depolarizing potentials which can trigger repetitive discharges. These depolarizing potentials result from direct feedback of dendritically released excitatory transmitter onto the same and neighbouring relay neurones. Such a process might contribute to epileptogenic neuronal discharge.

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Author information

Author notes

    • C. E. Jahr

    Present address: Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Affiliations

  1. Departments of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA

    • R. A. Nicoll
    •  & C. E. Jahr

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https://doi.org/10.1038/296441a0

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