Correlative genetic variation in natural populations of cats, mice and men

Abstract

The study of the extent and basis of gene-enzyme variation has long been a principal concern of population genetics. Numerous surveys have indicated considerable amounts of genetic variation detectable in natural populations, with few exceptions1–14. The variances of average heterozygosities (H) between species and among populations within species are large, prompting Lewontin to emphasize the importance of large gene sample sizes7 and Selander to encourage analysis of variation of homologous gene-enzyme systems when making species comparisons8. We present here a comparative genetic analysis of electrophoretic variation at 57 homologous biochemical loci of cats, mice and men. The distribution of polymorphism among the sampled loci in the three species was nonrandom. A large group of sampled loci (60%) were monomorphic in all three species, whereas a second group (30%) of the loci were polymorphic in two or more species. This conservation of the tolerance of genetic polymorphism is apparently more a characteristic of a particular locus than of the vertebrate species or of the genome. The current hypotheses for classifying polymorphic and monomorphic loci in terms of physiological and physical enzyme characteristics have been re-examined.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1

    Powell, J. in Evolutionary Biology Vol. 8 (eds Dobzhansky, T., Hecht, M. K. & Steere, W. C.) 79–119 (Plenum, New York, 1976).

  2. 2

    Harris, H. & Hopkinson, D. A. Ann. hum. Genet. 36, 9–20 (1972).

  3. 3

    Lewontin, R. C. & Hubby, J. L. Genetics 54, 595–609 (1966).

  4. 4

    Selander, R. K. & Yang, S. Y. Genetics 63, 653–667 (1969).

  5. 5

    Selander, R. K., Hunt, W. G. & Yang, S. Y. Evolution 23, 379–390 (1969).

  6. 6

    O'Brien, S. J. J. Hered. 71, 2–8 (1980).

  7. 7

    Lewontin, R. C. The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change (Columbia University Press, New York, 1974).

  8. 8

    Selander, R. K. in Molecular Evolution (ed. Ayala, F.) 21–45 (Sinauer, Massachusetts, 1976).

  9. 9

    Johnson, G. B. in Molecular Evolution (ed. Ayala, F.) (Sinauer, Massachusetts, 1976).

  10. 10

    Rice, M. C., Gardner, M. B. & O'Brien, S. J. Biochem. Genet. 8, 915–928 (1980).

  11. 11

    Racine, R. R. & Langley, C. H. Nature 283, 855 (1980).

  12. 12

    Bonnell, M. L. & Selander, R. K. Science 184, 908–910 (1974).

  13. 13

    Cameron, D. G. & Vyse, E. R. Biochem. Genet. 16, 651–657 (1978).

  14. 14

    Manlove, M. N., Baccus, R., Pelton, M. R., Smith, M. H. & Gruber, D. in Proc. 4th Int. Conf. Bear Research and Management (ed. Martinka, C. J.) (Wildlife Management Inst., in the press).

  15. 15

    Harris, H. & Hopkinson, D. A. Handbook of Enzyme Electrophoresis in Human Genetics (North Holland, Amsterdam, 1976).

  16. 16

    Pearson, P. L. et al. Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 25, 82–95 (1979).

  17. 17

    O'Brien, S. J. & Nash, W. G. (submitted).

  18. 18

    Shows, T. et al. Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 25, 96–116 (1979).

  19. 19

    Committee on Standardization of Genetic Nomenclature for Mice J. Hered. 63, 69–72 (1972).

  20. 20

    Harris, H. Isozyme Bull. 10, 22–25 (1977).

  21. 21

    Nei, M. & Roychoudhury, A. K. Am. J. hum. Genet. 26, 421–443 (1974).

  22. 22

    Gardner, M. B. Curr. Topics Microbiol Immun. 79, 215–259 (1978).

  23. 23

    Berry, R. J. & Peters, J. Proc. R. Soc. B197, 485–503 (1977).

  24. 24

    Rice, M. C. & O'Brien, S. J. Nature 283, 157–161 (1980).

  25. 25

    Staats, J. Cancer Res. 36, 4333–4377 (1976).

  26. 26

    Meera Khan, P., Los, W. R. T., van der Does, J. A. & Epstein, R. B. Transplantation 15, 624–628 (1973).

  27. 27

    Klein, J. Biology of the Mouse Histocompatibility-2 Complex (Springer, New York, 1975).

  28. 28

    Gotze, D. (ed.) The Major Histocompatibility System in Man and Animals (Springer, New York, 1977).

  29. 29

    Gillespie, J. H. & Kojima, K. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 61, 582–585 (1968).

  30. 30

    Kojima, K., Gillespie, J. H. & Tobari, Y. N. Biochem. Genet. 4, 627–637 (1970).

  31. 31

    Gillespie, J. H. & Langley, C. H. Genetics 76, 837–848 (1974).

  32. 32

    Johnson, G. B. Science 184, 28–37 (1974).

  33. 33

    Zouros, E. Nature 254, 446–448 (1975).

  34. 34

    Koehn, R. K. & Eanes, W. F. Evolut. Biol. 11, 39–100 (1978).

  35. 35

    Harris, H., Hopkinson, D. A. & Edwards, Y. H. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 74, 698–701 (1977).

  36. 36

    Kimara, M. & Ohta, T. Nature 229, 467–499 (1971).

  37. 37

    Lalley, P. A., Minna, J. D. & Franke, U. Nature 274, 160–163 (1978).

  38. 38

    Lalley, P. A., Francke, U. & Minna, J. D. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75, 2382–2386 (1978).

  39. 39

    Hopkinson, D. A., Edwards, Y. H. & Harris, H. Ann. hum. Genet. 39, 383–411 (1976).

  40. 40

    Sober, H. A. Handbook of Biochemistry, Selected Data for Molecular Biology (CRC, Cleveland, 1970).

  41. 41

    Everitt, B. S. Br. J. math. stat. Psychol. 21, 97–103 (1968).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.