Letter | Published:

Role of corticosteroid-binding globulin in interaction of corticosterone with uterine and brain progesterone receptors

Naturevolume 287pages5860 (1980) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The central actions of the steroid hormone progesterone remain an enigma. However, there is no doubt that this hormone has a vital role in the control of sexual function and behaviour in many species, including man. Furthermore, progesterone may be involved in the premenstrual and postpartum syndromes1. It would therefore be very useful to know the role and mechanism of action of progesterone in the brain. We now show that there are differences between progesterone receptors in brain and uterus, and possibly in the distribution of the serum progesterone-binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which may enter uterine but not brain cells.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Pharmacology, St Thomas's Hospital Medical School, London, SE1 7EH, UK

    • H. Al-Khouri
    •  & B. D. Greenstein

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https://doi.org/10.1038/287058a0

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