Letter | Published:

Distribution of membrane anionic sites on B16 melanoma variants with differing lung colonising potential

Abstract

The interaction of metastatic cells with their environment is mediated to a large extent by the cell surface1–5. Although several biochemical differences beteen tumour cells with low or high metastatic potentials have been reported6–10, the specific surface characteristics associated with metastasis have not yet been identified. One distinctive feature of murine B16 melanoma variants with low (B16-F1, B16-F10Lr) or high (B16-F10) lung colonisation potentials11,12 is their propensity to aggregate in vitro with other tumour cells (homotypic clumping)13,14, or with host cells (heterotypic clumping)15,16. The initial sites for membrane–membrane recognition, contact and subsequent interaction are thought to be associated with dense membrane anionic sites17–20. In the experiments reported here we determined that the distribution of cell-surface dense anionic sites, examined ultrastructurally with the use of cationised ferritin (CF), is correlated with tumour cell aggregation in vitro and/or production of pulmonary tumour colonies following intravenous (i.v.) injection into syngeneic recipients.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1

    Fidler, I. J., Gersten, D. M. & Hart, I. R. Adv. Cancer Res. 28, 149–250 (1978).

  2. 2

    Nicolson, G. L. Biochim. biophys. Acta 458, 1–72 (1976).

  3. 3

    Hynes, R. O. Biochim. biophys. Acta 458, 73–107 (1976).

  4. 4

    Hakomori, S. Biochim. biophys. Acta 417, 55–90 (1975).

  5. 5

    Warren, L., Buck, C. A. & Tuszynski, G. P. Biochim. biophys. Acta 516, 97–127 (1978).

  6. 6

    Bosmann, H. B. et al. Nature 246, 487–489 (1973).

  7. 7

    Nicolson, G. L. et al. in Cell and Tissue Interaction (eds Lash, J. W. & Burger, M. M.) 225–241 (Raven, New York, 1977).

  8. 8

    Warren, L., Zeidman, I. & Buck, C. A. Cancer Res. 35, 2186–2190 (1975).

  9. 9

    Tao, T. W. & Burger, M. M. Nature 270, 437–438 (1977).

  10. 10

    Poste, G. & Fidler, I. J. Nature 283, 139–146 (1980).

  11. 11

    Fidler, I. J. Nature new Biol. 242, 148–149 (1973).

  12. 12

    Fidler, I. J., Gersten, D. M. & Budmen, M. B. Cancer Res. 36, 3160–3165 (1976).

  13. 13

    Nicolson, G. L., Brunson, K. W. & Fidler, I. J. Acta histochem. cytochem. 10, 114–133 (1977).

  14. 14

    Winkelhake, J. L. & Nicolson, G. L. J. natn. Cancer Inst. 56, 285–298 (1976).

  15. 15

    Gasic, G. J., Gasic, T. B., Galanti, N., Johanson, R. & Murphy, S. Int. J. Cancer 11, 704–718 (1973).

  16. 16

    Fidler, I. J. & Bucana, C. Cancer Res. 37, 3945–3956 (1977).

  17. 17

    Weiss, L. & Subjeck, J. R. J. Cell Sci. 14, 215–223 (1974).

  18. 18

    Grinnell, F., Tobelman, M. Q. & Hackenbrock, C. R. J. Cell Biol. 16, 470–479 (1975).

  19. 19

    Abe, H., Moscarello, M. A. & Sturgess, J. M. J. Cell Biol. 71, 973–979 (1976).

  20. 20

    Hackenbrock, C. R. & Miller, K. J. J. Cell Biol. 65, 615–630 (1975).

  21. 21

    Warren, L. J. biol. Chem. 234, 1971–1975 (1954).

  22. 22

    Danon, D., Goldstein, L., Marikovsky, Y. & Skutelsky, E. J. ultrastruct. Res. 38, 500–510 (1972).

  23. 23

    Marikovsky, Y., Inbar, M., Danon, D. & Sachs, L. Expl Cell Res. 89, 359–367 (1974).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.