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Cytochalasin B induces polarisation of plasma membrane components and actin in transformed cells

Nature volume 274, pages 915917 (31 August 1978) | Download Citation

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Abstract

ALTERATIONS in the surface membrane associated with transition of cells from the normal to the transformed state include changes in morphology1,2, membrane transport3, agglutination by plant lectins4,5, contact inhibition of growth6 and change in the lateral mobility of membrane components7. It has been suggested that these changes in surface properties are related to changes in the cytoskeleton. This idea is based on the concept that microfilaments and microtubules determine the topographical distribution and the mobility of membrane components and on the observation that in several cell types microfilament bundles disappear after transformation8–10. However, there is also evidence that the presence of microfilament bundles is related to adhesiveness to the substratum and is dissociable from cellular growth control11. We report here evidence for a difference in the cytoskeletal control of plasma membrane mobility between normal and transformed cells. We show that cytochalasin B (CB) induces polarisation of membrane components and actin and provokes a marked enhancement of capping in transformed but not in normal cells.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Immunology, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, S-105 21 Stockholm, Sweden

    • K.-G. SUNDQVIST
  2. Department of Periodontology, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, S-105 21 Stockholm, Sweden

    • P. OTTESKOG
  3. The National Bacteriological Laboratory, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, S-105 21 Stockholm, Sweden

    • K.-G. SUNDQVIST
    •  & P. OTTESKOG
  4. Department of Medical Cell Research and Genetics, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, S-105 21 Stockholm, Sweden

    • T. EGE

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https://doi.org/10.1038/274915a0

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