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Photoperiodically determined dimorphic calling songs in a katydid

Nature volume 274, pages 887888 (31 August 1978) | Download Citation

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Abstract

MALES of most species of katydids (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae) make calling songs that attract conspecific females1–4. These songs, like those of crickets, cicadas, and some grasshoppers, are species specific and can be produced in perfect form by males that have never heard a similar song5. The fact that insect calling songs are the same even though conditions during their development varied from generation to generation and between field and laboratory has led to the inference that the ontogeny of such songs is free of environmental modification6. We show here, however, that the calling songs of a katydid are dimorphic and photoperiodically determined.

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Author information

Author notes

    • JAMES J. WHITESELL

    Present address: Biology Dept., Valdosta State College, Valdosta, Georgia 31601.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611

    • JAMES J. WHITESELL
    •  & THOMAS J. WALKER

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/274887a0

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