Letter | Published:

Effect on mortality of the 1974 fuel crisis

Nature volume 257, pages 306307 (25 September 1975) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

THE 1974 fuel crisis was a natural experiment. It presented the opportunity to test the hypothesis that a decrease in vehicular exhaust fumes would have a beneficial effect on health. During the first quarter of 1974 retail gasoline sales were reduced by 9.5% in San Francisco and Alameda Counties, California. Total exhaust emissions were reduced by an even greater amount because of hoarding of fuel and lowered highway speed limits. To assess the possible effects of this selective decrease in pollution, mortality rates from these two counties were examined. The rates for the first quarter of 1974 were compared with corresponding rates from the first quarters of 1970–73.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Epidemiology Research Unit, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California 94704

    • STEPHEN M. BROWN
    • , MICHAEL G. MARMOT
    • , SUSAN T. SACKS
    •  & LINDA W. KWOK

Authors

  1. Search for STEPHEN M. BROWN in:

  2. Search for MICHAEL G. MARMOT in:

  3. Search for SUSAN T. SACKS in:

  4. Search for LINDA W. KWOK in:

About this article

Publication history

Received

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/257306a0

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.