Active Transport of Iron by Intestine: Selective Genetic Defect in the Mouse

Abstract

THE discovery of sex-linked anaemia in the descendants of an irradiated mouse was followed by further evidence and the suggestion2 that there was a hereditary defect in intestinal iron absorption in these animals. Our studies on everted gut sacs in vitro provide the first direct evidence of a selective genetic defect in the second or serosal transfer step3 of the active transport mechanism for iron in the duodenum of the sex-linked anaemic (sla) mouse.

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References

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    Falconer, D. S., and Isaacson, J. H., Genet. Res. Camb., 3, 248 (1962).

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    Pinkerton, P. H., and Bannerman, R. M., Nature, 216, 482 (1967).

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    Manis, J. G., and Schachter, D., Amer. J. Physiol., 203, 73 (1962).

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    Biology of the Laboratory Mouse (edit. by Green, E. L.), second ed., 352 (McGraw-Hill, New York).

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    Manis, J. G., and Schachter, D., Amer. J. Physiol., 203, 81 (1962).

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MANIS, J. Active Transport of Iron by Intestine: Selective Genetic Defect in the Mouse. Nature 227, 385–386 (1970). https://doi.org/10.1038/227385a0

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