Bursting Air Bubbles studied by the Time Exposure Technique

Abstract

THERE are several mechanisms by which particulate matter is transferred across the sea–air interface. Filaments of liquid are torn from the tops of whitecaps by the wind and are generated by the break-up of combers. The mechanism of greatest meteorological importance is, however, the bursting, at the interface, of bubbles of air which have been trapped under the water surface or have been released from solution.

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References

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DAY, J. Bursting Air Bubbles studied by the Time Exposure Technique. Nature 216, 1097–1099 (1967). https://doi.org/10.1038/2161097b0

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