Letter | Published:

Nuclear Histones and Early Embryogenesis of the Chick

Nature volume 212, pages 304306 (15 October 1966) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

THE biological processes of differentiation and development must involve a differential expression of the genome. The mechanisms for control of such expression are as yet unknown. A genetic regulatory function has been postulated, however, for certain basic cellular proteins, the histones1–3. The presence of histones within the cell nucleus, their association with DNA and UNA, and their molecular heterogeneity give support to this concept4. Furthermore, interactions between histones and in vitro DNA-dependent RNA synthesis systems have been reported5–8. In a developing embryo, differentiation might be reflected by changes in the nuclear histone complement as new and differentiated tissues are formed, especially during the early stages of embryogenesis, such as gastrulation, when the primary organ rudiments are first formed. For these reasons, an investigation was made of the electrophoretic patterns and amino-acid compositions of histones extracted from nuclei of the chick embryo from gastrulation to 7 days of age.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    , and , Nature, 166, 780 (1950).

  2. 2.

    , , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 50, 893 (1963).

  3. 3.

    , , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 51, 786 (1964).

  4. 4.

    , Ann. Rev. Biochem., 34, 209 (1965).

  5. 5.

    , and , J. Mol. Biol., 6, 169 (1963).

  6. 6.

    , and , Nature, 199, 1170 (1963).

  7. 7.

    , Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 12, 175 (1963).

  8. 8.

    , , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 53, 626 (1965).

  9. 9.

    , and , J. Morphol., 88, 49 (1951).

  10. 10.

    , Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 97, 387 (1962).

  11. 11.

    , , , and , Biochem. J., 80, 189 (1961).

  12. 12.

    , and , Anal. Biochem., 14, 356 (1966).

  13. 13.

    , Science, 144, 420 (1964).

  14. 14.

    , and (unpublished observations).

  15. 15.

    , , and , Biochem. J., 82, 123 (1962).

  16. 16.

    , and , Science, 145, 1059 (1964).

  17. 17.

    , and , Biochem. J., 98, 5P (1966).

  18. 18.

    , and , Nature, 207, 638 (1965).

  19. 19.

    , , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 51, 786 (1964).

  20. 20.

    , , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 55, 805 (1966).

  21. 21.

    , , , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 55, 858 (1966).

  22. 22.

    , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 54, 960 (1965).

  23. 23.

    , and , Proc. U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci., 50, 1059 (1963).

  24. 24.

    , and , Anal. Biochem., 12, 421 (1965).

  25. 25.

    , and , Scientific Memorandum No. 113 (Information Exchange Group No. 7, 1965).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Biochemistry, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, The University of Texas, Houston.

    • C. WARD KISCHER
  2. Biomedical Research Group, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, University of California, Los Alamos, New Mexico.

    • L. R. GURLEY
    •  & G. R. SHEPHERD

Authors

  1. Search for C. WARD KISCHER in:

  2. Search for L. R. GURLEY in:

  3. Search for G. R. SHEPHERD in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/212304b0

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.