Letter

Inhibition of Cell Division in Escherichia coli by Electrolysis Products from a Platinum Electrode

  • Nature volume 205, pages 698699 (13 February 1965)
  • doi:10.1038/205698a0
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Published:

Abstract

IN an investigation of the possible effects of an electric field on growth processes in bacteria, we have discovered a new and interesting effect. In E. coli, the presence of certain group VIIIb transition metal compounds in concentrations of about 1–10 parts per million of the metal in the culture medium causes an inhibition of the cell division process. The bacteria form long filaments, up to 300 times the normal length, which implies that the growth process is not markedly affected.

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References

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    , et al., Studies of Biosynthesis in E. coli, Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 607 (Washington D. C., 1955).

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Biophysics Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing.

    • BARNETT ROSENBERG
    • , LORETTA VAN CAMP
    •  & THOMAS KRIGAS

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