Letter | Published:

Solubility Relations of Fluorine Compounds and Inert Gas Narcosis

Nature volume 204, page 789 (21 November 1964) | Download Citation

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Abstract

TWO main physicochemical theories of inert gas narcosis have been put forward. The Meyer–Overton1 theory postulates that the intensity of narcotic action varies as the concentration of narcotic in the lipids. More recently, Pauling2 and Miller3 have suggested that the aqueous phases play a dominant part and relate narcotic activity to the tendency to form hydrates or more generally to induce structure (‘icebergs’) in water.

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    Data taken largely from refs. 3, 4, 6.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Physical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford.

    • R. A. DAWE
    • , K. W. MILLER
    •  & E. B. SMITH

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https://doi.org/10.1038/204789a0

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