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Hydroxylation of Phenoxyacetic Acid and Anisole by Aspergillus niger (van Tiegh)

Abstract

INVESTIGATIONS of the hydroxylating activity of A. niger have been carried out mainly in connexion with the metabolism of the phenoxy- and naphthyloxy-alkyl-carboxylic acids1,2, at least in part because of the importance of these compounds as herbicides. We have been examining the action of this organism, using van Tiegh strain, on various benzenoid compounds, and since our results for the hydroxylation of phenoxyacetic acid differ fundamentally from those obtained with van Tiegh (Mulder) strain1, we wish to report our findings for both this compound and the related aromatic ether, anisole.

References

  1. 1

    Woodcock, D., in Phenolics in Plants in Health and Disease, edit. by Pridham, J. B. (Pergamon Press, 1960).

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  2. 2

    Faulkner, J. K., and Woodcock, D., J. Chem. Soc., 5397 (1961).

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    Brodie, B. B., et al., Science, 121, 603 (1955). Axelrod, J., J. Pharmacol. Exp. Therap., 115, 259 (1955).

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BOCKS, S., SMITH, J. & NORMAN, R. Hydroxylation of Phenoxyacetic Acid and Anisole by Aspergillus niger (van Tiegh). Nature 201, 398 (1964). https://doi.org/10.1038/201398a0

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